10 Comments

Great post as always, Mr. Owl. Again I appreciate the figures that blend in with the rest of your Substack!

I really like what you said:

> A purely linear view of time is exhausting. There is a perpetual sense of forward motion, with no rest.

I really feel like this is something that meditation has helped me with. It has given me the capacity to stop trying to keep up and just rest.

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Mar 13Liked by Max Goodbird

The cyclic model has some good defendants from a mathematical perspective. In a cambridge princeton cooperation a cycling model od the universe has ben proposed: https://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/turok07/turok07_index.html

https://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-th/0111030.pdf

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Dec 22, 2022Liked by Max Goodbird

Good post, but I would push against an example in the opening section. Most New Agers very much did *not* expect the end of time, they expected the beginning of a new age (the Age of Aquarius or Satya Yuga or the Millennium or whatnot), which might or might not involve the destruction of the present one; hence the name "New Age". Theirs seems a very cyclical conception of time, often explicitely inspired by Hindu/Buddhist cosmology. Of course this doesn't affect much the post's main points.

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Dec 15, 2022Liked by Max Goodbird

If you're interested in music, perhaps this book would interest you.

https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520257979/bachs-cycle-mozarts-arrow

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Wouldn't a 'spiral' view of time contain both the linear and the cyclical views of time?

Although i guess then someone might ask, "does the spiral go anywhere? Or is it going in a loop and connecting with itself again?"

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I don’t know if I’m stating the obvious, but as per Iain McGilchrist’s model of reality (which explains SO much that I would encourage anyone to delve into it), time as an arrow is the fruit a left hemisphere view whereas time as a circle is the fruit of a right hemispheric perspective. It goes a lot deeper than that if you’re willing to dig a little.

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"we notice novelty while repetition fades into unconsciousness. " - I loved this read, thank you for putting it together

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